City vs track frame

#1
I am currently set up for the track frame in batch 2, but was wondering what everyone's thoughts were on city vs track. I have been doing a lot of research and it seems that most kit cars do not go with a full roll cage. Is it a lot more difficult to get in the track frame with bucket seats vs the city frame?
 

Jkean949

Something witty
#2
I know I was really torn with which frame to go with. The reason I ultimately went with track is that if I want to do something with the car later like autocross (or....) I didn't want to be limited. The track frame won't keep it from being street legal here...so I saw it as an avenue that would keep the car open to whatever I want to use it for.

Just my thoughts on why I went the way I did...I had the same concern about getting in... :-X
 

Adam

Administrator
Staff member
#3
The track frame is definitely harder to get into but it isn't that challenging. I can get in and out pretty easily and I'm rotund (5'11 ~250 pounds).

Getting in as the driver: right leg, left leg (at this point you are sitting on the upper door bar), then lower yourself in using the halo to do the down portion of a chin up.

It's true that a lot of kit cars don't offer a full cage. At most autocrosses and track days this is fine as long as the roll bar is above your head. The track frame assures that you won't run into trouble at the events that aren't so friendly with open tops.

Another reason we decided to design the car with a full cage is that we really hope to eventually start a race class for wheel to wheel racing. A bunch of closely matched, relatively inexpensive mid-engined cars racing together would be a blast. With side by side racing, wrecks are going to happen and the track frame will be far safer.
 

DanPerryy

Well-Known Member
#4
I am tall - 6'4, old and fat. The track car's halo is easy to hold onto to get in an out, but both legs need to go into and be removed from the car at the same time. Sitting on the upper rail frame does the trick. The city car I drove was P1 and the P1 frame had just 2 rails, the top rail being at near the same height as the mid rail on the current frames. It was much easier to get into and out of although there was nothing to hold onto to pull yourself up. A front roll bar, to hold onto and 20 pullups a day would have helped me.

Seriously, both are not that hard to get into and out of, even for tall old fat farts.
 

PHerder

Well-Known Member
#5
Well, I am 5' 8" tall and weigh ~ 150 so I probably will not have any problems. :D

I did have a big problem getting out of my Stalker (Lotus 7 replica) with shoulder pain. You have to push up on the trans tunnel and the side of the car to get up and out. I ended up selling the Stalker but the pain didn't go away. 5 surgeries on my shoulders (both rotator cuffs torn and a problem with rejecting the metal implant) in a year and a half and now I am back to being able to climb out without pain.

Looking forward to building my track frame Goblin.
 

Adam

Administrator
Staff member
#8
carld1979 said:
Does any one have pictures of the track frame with all the panels on it
We don't yet. We are painting the first new nose cone today and will be installing it on a city frame tomorrow. This will be the only Goblin with body panels for a few months.
 
#9
I was thinking this too. I'd rather go track frame as for reasons above. I know Rallyracer was concerned the "a pillar" bar would be in the way of the view, but I didn't think any more so than the stock cobalt's?
 

rallyracer

Well-Known Member
#11
Can't you still get on the track with the city frame? I'm planning on taking it to bowling Green now and then.
I don't see why not. The Atom doesn't have a full cage over head, and neither do many Miata Exocet...and these are at tracks all over the world. I guess it comes down to the track owners/Org running the event, passing tech, etc...

I know here they want at least a loop bar behind the drivers and passengers head for protection at events, if you drive a convertible.

Also, a fire extinguisher will likely be needed too. So coming up with an assessable secure place to mount it will be a must.
 
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#12
Alright guys, I'm revisiting this again, the team is starting to build my frame today and I have one last chance to decide track vs city this evening. I know that the track frame is not that difficult to get in, but the city is a good bit easier. It also does have cleaner visual lines IMO. On the other hand, I plan on having about 350rwhp, so safety is an important concern.

Pros of city frame:
Easier to get into
Cleaner visual lines

Pros of track frame:
More roll over protection
Can attach a mesh top cover for sun protection
 
#14
I vote for whatever they can finish sooner.

For real tho I'd pick the track frame.
Decided on the track frame, mainly for safety. Had someone bring up the case of running into something with an overhand, like the back of a truck or a guardrail. Could get ugly without the a pillars. Can't wait!
 
#15
Decided on the track frame, mainly for safety. Had someone bring up the case of running into something with an overhand, like the back of a truck or a guardrail. Could get ugly without the a pillars. Can't wait!
That's why I am leaning towards the track frame, even though I don't plan to do much racing (if at all).

I once was involved in a crash where my car had a full cage, it saved my life.
 

Silverback

Well-Known Member
#16
Safety and chassis rigidity are big pluses for the track frame. I had mine built with additional tubes running from the cage to the front. Plus, you can hang onto the top of the cage to get yourself into and out of the cockpit.

 
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#17
Ok this was pretty much the simplest decision for me to make. I made the decision immediately when faced with the choice of City vs Track frame...

My answer is the Track frame I wouldn't have mine any other way...

The number one thing about me and has been for my whole life, is when I do something I do it completely to the max of my abilities.

So when I wreck a vehical it is always going to be a wreck of epic proportions. I have only been in two wrecks in my whole life and they were both extreme examples of how the proper use of saftey equipment can and will save lives. I will definitely be ordering the track frame because the saftey of Chris is one of my top concerns...

I may be the only one in the world concerned with Chris's saftey, but I do know Chris better than anyone else in the world knows him. So believe me when I say sometimes you gotta keep an eye on him and pay attention to what he is doing or thinking about...
Because one thing is for sure he is CRAZY...
Most of the time its just a fun crazy, but sometimes it can be down right unpredictable and dangerous...

Track frame for Chris's safety
 
#18
Interesting thread... I am short and fat with horrible knees. I drive my Ion with the seat all of the way back and I am pretty sure that I will look like ten pounds of dookie in a 3 pound bag, when I attempt to shove my heftybag full of flab ass, in to that poor little Goblin.
 

IDRVSLO

Well-Known Member
#19
I went with the track because I like the look and added protection. I wont admit it too much but wish at times I had the extended due to the space behind the seat. The mounts have 3 positions for the seats but if you are really short I would suggest sliders.
 
#20
I went with the track because I like the look and added protection. I wont admit it too much but wish at times I had the extended due to the space behind the seat. The mounts have 3 positions for the seats but if you are really short I would suggest sliders.
I plan to use the Recaros from the donor car because they're awesome. Added space behind the seats is definitely a plus for a lot of reasons, the possibility of using the seat sliders, being one of them!