Rear Toe Link Rack

KingChuck24

Well-Known Member
Any good pictures of this, I searched the forums for a little and couldn't find any? Also any good ones of the rear sway bar, I am 90% sure I got mine in correctly just want to be 100%.

Here is one picture I found,
36497

This one has a bar running across it, would that be one of the steel parts DF provided?
 

Robinjo

Goblin Guru
Yes, it's a steel bar that the DF supplied tie rods and the front tie rod ends mount to. My photos aren't great, but hopefully it helps add context to the one you found already.

Edit: my photos have the bar upside down. Do it the way below in posts #7. I swapped mine to the correct position and it made a huge difference with higher speed bumps. My rear end doesn't pucker as much when hitting bridges or asphalt changes at highway speed now.
2022-08-28 Rear Stabilizer Orientation.JPG2022-08-28 Rear Stabilizer Setup.JPG
 
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jamesm

Goblin Guru
Yes, it's a steel bar that the DF supplied tie rods and the front tie rod ends mount to. My photos aren't great, but hopefully it helps add context to the one you found already.
That toe link bar is upside down. It will have a ton of bump-steer if you leave it this way.
 

Robinjo

Goblin Guru
It will have a ton of bump-steer if you leave it this way.
Just curious, what will cause the bump steer if it's upside down? Isn't the unit and hubs still fixed in place regardless of what orientation it is? I'm asking for knowledge and learning.
 

RCK605

Active Member
Bump steer is caused by suspension geometry and the tie rods. The tie rod end is a fixed length and travels on an arc as the wheel moves up and down over bumps. This essentially moves the tie rod end in or out, which then pivots the wheel and changing your alignment.
 

jamesm

Goblin Guru
I'm sure one of the engineers can give a more detailed answer, but the TLDR is when it's upside down, it increases the angle of the tie rod. This causes the wheel to toe in/out as the wheel moves up and down
 

Gtstorey

Goblin Guru
The toe link rod needs to be as centered as possible iwhen the car is at its neutral normal ride height position. That minimizes bumpsteer as it travels above and below the neutral point.
 

Robinjo

Goblin Guru
I'm sure one of the engineers can give a more detailed answer, but the TLDR is when it's upside down, it increases the angle of the tie rod. This causes the wheel to toe in/out as the wheel moves up and down
Nah, this was a good enough description.
 
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