Cerakote, Gunkote, Aluma Hyde for chassis and accessories?

LLBenJ

Active Member
Has anyone considered, or used, one of these applications for the frame, accessories and other parts for the Goblin?

I have no background in automotive painting but a couple decades in the firearms industry. I've used these products on firearms and suppressors with good results. They tend to hold up well. I'm looking at "burnt bronze, flat" as the primary color for my chassis and other parts to include high temp Cerakote for those parts that see heat.
 

Tinkles

Well-Known Member
Cerakoting your whole chassis is going to be expensive. Plus finding a Cerakote guy with an oven big enough to fit the chassis in is going to be very hard. I have small things that are going to see heat/chemicals Cerakoted. I have talked with my Cerakote guy about the larger stuff and we concluded that if it didn't need the heat/chemical protection then paint/powdercoat was a better option do to cost and logistics.
 

Sparvy

Active Member
Has anyone considered, or used, one of these applications for the frame, accessories and other parts for the Goblin?

I have no background in automotive painting but a couple decades in the firearms industry. I've used these products on firearms and suppressors with good results. They tend to hold up well. I'm looking at "burnt bronze, flat" as the primary color for my chassis and other parts to include high temp Cerakote for those parts that see heat.
I just re coated my exhaust with the air dry/cure burnt bronze after a few attempts with high temp header paint that always failed. I've always used the oven cure cerakote so it will be interesting to see how it holds up.
 

socaljeff3798

Well-Known Member
I am a certified Cerakoter and had a business in California that was all we did.
I am not looking for business as I am retired but would be happy to answer any Cerakote questions. I have done litiertally thousand of part us most all of Cerkotes products and can give you my opinion on what works best for what parts. You are welcome to call me at 951-317-9307. Some parts on my Goblin are Cerakoted others a Powder coated.....Its not a one size fits all.
 

LLBenJ

Active Member
Cerakoting your whole chassis is going to be expensive. Plus finding a Cerakote guy with an oven big enough to fit the chassis in is going to be very hard. I have small things that are going to see heat/chemicals Cerakoted. I have talked with my Cerakote guy about the larger stuff and we concluded that if it didn't need the heat/chemical protection then paint/powdercoat was a better option do to cost and logistics.
Yes, I'd definitely have to use the C-Series cerakote for the chassis. At $498 a gallon I'll have to do some research but it may be competitive with powder coating, get the flat finish I'm looking for, and I'll be able to touch it up when/if needed.
 

socaljeff3798

Well-Known Member
Yes, I'd definitely have to use the C-Series cerakote for the chassis. At $498 a gallon I'll have to do some research but it may be competitive with powder coating, get the flat finish I'm looking for, and I'll be able to touch it up when/if needed.
LLBenj, A couple of things. Talk to any painter that ever painted tubes and they will tell you they hate it. It very hard to get a consistant finish and not get runs. Spraying Cerakote is no diffrent than painting in the sense its a learned skill. And getting a consistant flat finish on a large area is not easy to do. Unlike paint with cerkote there is "Sanding or buffing" mistakes. As far as touch up once the cerakote has cured it would be like painting on a non stick pan. It wont adhere and and you will see where it was "spotted in" When I have a problem with a job there is no "touching it up" Its a complete Do over. Strip it and start over. You mentioned the cost of the Cerakote. You also need a good gun with the right tip. And no they dont sell it at harbor freight. The gun I use is an Iwata and its over $300.00 So add that to your cost And you still need a paint booth or like paint there will be all kinds of crap in it. Also Cerkote is not UV stable so in time it fades as well. Just to close if a customer brought me a chassis to do in Cerakote I would turn them away for all the reasons I stated. You can get a flat bronze in powder coat. I would simply do that. I hope this sheads some light on using Cerakote. I am including a couple of pictures of my work to show that I do know what I am talking about.
 

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LLBenJ

Active Member
LLBenj, A couple of things. Talk to any painter that ever painted tubes and they will tell you they hate it. It very hard to get a consistant finish and not get runs. Spraying Cerakote is no diffrent than painting in the sense its a learned skill. And getting a consistant flat finish on a large area is not easy to do. Unlike paint with cerkote there is "Sanding or buffing" mistakes. As far as touch up once the cerakote has cured it would be like painting on a non stick pan. It wont adhere and and you will see where it was "spotted in" When I have a problem with a job there is no "touching it up" Its a complete Do over. Strip it and start over. You mentioned the cost of the Cerakote. You also need a good gun with the right tip. And no they dont sell it at harbor freight. The gun I use is an Iwata and its over $300.00 So add that to your cost And you still need a paint booth or like paint there will be all kinds of crap in it. Also Cerkote is not UV stable so in time it fades as well. Just to close if a customer brought me a chassis to do in Cerakote I would turn them away for all the reasons I stated. You can get a flat bronze in powder coat. I would simply do that. I hope this sheads some light on using Cerakote. I am including a couple of pictures of my work to show that I do know what I am talking about.
Sir

I appreciate the insight. I too have applied Cerakote for many years, not much C-series though, and had excellent results when compared to other coatings. I'm tracking on the equipment required and that would have to be factored into the cost analysis. My research and experience has shown that Cerakote is often much better in the UV protection scenarios. Have you seen something different? I'm also tracking on the "touch up" points you made but I'm guessing powder coat is similar and it's an all in when recoating is required.

I'll ping the local shops and firearms manufactures in my area to see what options I've got. Cost is not a significant concern if the product wears well over time. Again, thank you!
 

socaljeff3798

Well-Known Member
Sir

I appreciate the insight. I too have applied Cerakote for many years, not much C-series though, and had excellent results when compared to other coatings. I'm tracking on the equipment required and that would have to be factored into the cost analysis. My research and experience has shown that Cerakote is often much better in the UV protection scenarios. Have you seen something different? I'm also tracking on the "touch up" points you made but I'm guessing powder coat is similar and it's an all in when recoating is required.

I'll ping the local shops and firearms manufactures in my area to see what options I've got. Cost is not a significant concern if the product wears well over time. Again, thank you!
The C-series shoots the same as the H-series. The hard part is not shooting it "Too dry" over a large area. And because tubes have such a small frontal area it makes it much worse. I would suggest you finding and old exhaust header and coat that and see just how difficult it is. I HATE doing headers. You are right there is no touch up on powder as well. I know a lot of the custom car builder will use cerakote on parts and I do as well. But I would never do things like wheels. Mostly brake calipers and the like. I am just trying to share my expeiances. and you are welcome to call me. FYI when I say I am a certified Coater it means I was at Cerkote and was trained by them not just self taught. It was a 9 month wait and over $2,000 with travel and worth every penny. Just trying to be helpful.
 

Bajakid1450

Well-Known Member
Cerakoting your whole chassis is going to be expensive. Plus finding a Cerakote guy with an oven big enough to fit the chassis in is going to be very hard. I have small things that are going to see heat/chemicals Cerakoted. I have talked with my Cerakote guy about the larger stuff and we concluded that if it didn't need the heat/chemical protection then paint/powdercoat was a better option do to cost and logistics.
C&m powdercoat in Piedmont sc does cerakote and chrome coating it’s worth a try to check them out mine was super cheap for my powder coating for everything like less than $700 for prismatic universe powder
 

LLBenJ

Active Member
Resurrecting this thread.

I'm looking at Steel-it for the chassis and other parts because I'm concerned about touch up later on. I would still like to use a burnt bronze color, not offered by steel-it, and looking for any other rattle can suggestions.
 

LLBenJ

Active Member
There is no touch up with cerakote...
Yup, would be difficult but certainly easier than even attempting to match powdercoat. The hardener determines the sheen in cerakote.

Looking at painting the chassis/parts now and looking for solutions other than black, silver and grey.
 

k.rollin

Goblin Guru
I don't know what they offer for a burnt bronze type of color, but I specifically used Cardinal Paint's GR02 powder because they sell color matched aerosols that I could use for touch up (or to color match parts I added after the fact).
 
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