Goblin frame prep for paint?

newbtrying

Member
Just in case your curious. I dropped off my frame and all the stage one parts. No stage two or anything off the donor. They didn't know the exact cost yet because they had to order the one color I choose, the black color I choose for some parts they already had. My quote was $600-$800. I will know exactly when they finish. This should at least give you an idea of where you could be on cost.
powder coat, i assume?
 

escapepilot

Goblin Guru
The Cerakote option is interesting, but you'll need access to a large oven to cure it. Powdercoating is probably the best option but prices can vary significantly from less than $1000 to more than $2000. Paint is the most economical.

What is your end goal? Show car quality? Durability? Spend time instead of money? Listing your goals should help you narrow down your options to what is best for you.
 

RGSkid70

Active Member
I painted my frame and really wish I had gone with powder coat instead. I used a 2-part epoxy primer and 2-part poly color coat. Wasted about 80% of the material on overspray, and spent way more than $600. Add the time spent on prep work and clean up/touch-up, and the decision is clearly favoring powder. A powder coat shop is going to sand or bead blast for you. You'll get even coverage in every nook and cranny. If you're worried about matching color later, spend some time up front finding a color with a close color match to a good automotive rattle-can lacquer.
 

escapepilot

Goblin Guru
I painted my frame and really wish I had gone with powder coat instead. I used a 2-part epoxy primer and 2-part poly color coat. Wasted about 80% of the material on overspray, and spent way more than $600. Add the time spent on prep work and clean up/touch-up, and the decision is clearly favoring powder. A powder coat shop is going to sand or bead blast for you. You'll get even coverage in every nook and cranny. If you're worried about matching color later, spend some time up front finding a color with a close color match to a good automotive rattle-can lacquer.
A good paint shop can also color match to the powder coat and some can even put that in a rattle can.
 

LLBenJ

Active Member
The end result of the powder coat will exceed your costs in labor, time and resources. The shops that powder coat will properly prep and apply the product and it will probably be more durable than paint over time. As others have stated, getting complete coverage on these tube chassis can be challenging and there are quite a few parts, especially anything steel, that you'll want to coat in something. Getting those color matched to the frame just adds to the aesthetics and durability.

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