Alignment

JBINTX

Well-Known Member
I stumbled on this info from back in January 2018. Is this still what is suggested?
@Lonny

  • Front
    • Ride height: set to where the lower control arm is level to the ground with you (and a passenger) in it
    • Toe: +.15 degree (toe in)
    • Camber: -1.5 degrees
    • Caster: 8.5 degrees
  • Rear
    • Ride height: Control arms level to the ground or slightly up toward the middle of the car. We normally end up with 7-8 inches from the ground to the lower lip of the subframe where the control arm slips in but this varies depending on tire size.
    • Toe: +.15 degree (toe in)
    • Camber: -1.5 degrees
The more camber you can get front and rear, the better it will be for track use. However, while it is easy to add camber up front, the rear is a different story. Since we don't yet have adjustable top plates, the only way to adjust the rear camber is the method in the Cobalt service manual:
Basically you remove some material from the lower mounting hole of the strut to create a slot. Then you can get a little bit of camber adjustment.
 

Desert Sasqwatch

Goblin Guru
Rear camber can be adjusted using cam bolts - one or two per side - to get it correct or to the desired angle for the track.
Adjustable top plates would be better, but I have not seen anyone with them on the forum (yet).
 

JBINTX

Well-Known Member
Was the link you provided just a generic example, or are those the exact cam bolts we would use on the Goblin?
 

Ross

Goblin Guru
I have those bolts on my car, but I recommend grabbing a round file, and slotting the rear shock bolt hole, like GM and Lonny recommend.
 

Waterdriver

Goblin Guru
Was the link you provided just a generic example, or are those the exact cam bolts we would use on the Goblin?
I'm using the Moog version of the cam bolts, top and bottom strut mount holes. With both, you can achieve roughly -3 degrees of camber if needed.
 
Top