Custom Wraps

jamesm

Goblin Guru
My local shop quoted $800-1000 for full custom art, printed vinyl with over-laminate, and installation. That's for the hood, side panels, and engine cover.
 

askiles

Goblin Guru
My local shop quoted $800-1000 for full custom art, printed vinyl with over-laminate, and installation. That's for the hood, side panels, and engine cover.
That sounds like exactly what I expected, and would pay.
 

askiles

Goblin Guru
I had another local shop quote me $400 for the side panels and $600 for the hood. Sounds a lot closer to what I was thinking. That other shop was clearly on something, or thought they were wrapping the chassis and all maybe?!? Lol
 

Ark :D

Goblin Guru
Bump.

I've been debating for a while, what I want to do with my finished Goblin's appearance. Paint or wrap? I believe "wrap" is the answer I have settled on. No matter what I do, I'll be doing it myself because that's my mantra for this project: "do it yourself, stupid, and learn what you can along the way". Paint just seems too easy to screw up, plus I have zero experience painting cars, and no equipment either.

That being said, I have not decided whether to go with something from racinggraphics.com, or to go with a more solid color from Amazon. I don't really like many of the canned designs from racinggraphics.com, so I would probably go with something custom.

I guess I had a few questions for anyone here that's a more skilled/experienced wrapper than I am.

1) How hard is it REALLY? Like, I see people saying it was tough at first but got easier, I see people saying that tight corners and over-stretching will kill your project, and all manner of things like that. I know it's a 2-man job, but I would probably attempt it alone first. I've done everything alone up to this point, including dropping my donors' engines and stripping the dashes.

2) If I go with a solid color from Amazon, it'll likely be either carbon fiber black, or carbon fiber white. I would then do either a red or a blue stripe down the middle, possibly to cover a seam on the larger piece if I need to do it in two halves. Does wrap adhere to other wrap? Is this viable?

3) I've got some products added to my cart (saved for later) on Amazon, I'd like some opinions on:
  1. 3M Primer 94
  2. 3M Edge Sealer 3950
4) If you've wrapped your Goblin ... did you have to wrap if more than once to get it right? Just trying to stay budget-conscious here, it would be bad to ruin wrap from Amazon, and worse yet to ruin wrap from racinggraphics.com.

This is probably one of those "just shut up and do it" things. I don't have the side panels or engine cover yet, but I do have the hood so I'm thinking about pulling the trigger.

Thank you guys!
 

ctuinstra

Goblin Guru
I’ve had some practice in the past with window tint and installing logos on vehicles that helped me with the basics of installing the wrap. It wasn’t impossible but was frustrating at times and this was with two people. The sides are super easy, but the curves of the hood and the cutouts made it more difficult. Those two numb-nuts on YouTube tried a couple of times on their build and gave up and chopped it up into pieces and stuck it on there like stickers. Lol!

Not saying you can’t do it, I would do it again over paint. But don underestimate the job. Learn the techniques. It’s like trying to ice a soft cake with thick icing.
 

KSLunsfo

Well-Known Member
I'm nowhere near this point in the build myself but wish I had prior experience with wraps. I like the idea of wrapping the panels, but I actually have painting means as my dad has been in automotive body and paint longer than I've been around. So, it may lean towards painting for me. If I was going to get into wrapping I would start with some really cheap stuff and wrap a few random simple things to get a feel for it, then gradually try more complex pieces and buying higher quality wrap as confidence increases. It definitely appears to be an art form.
 

Karter2026

Goblin Guru
Like Chad said above I also have had experience in window tinting and installing decals. I did the decals on our police cars at work for 15 years. We had a bra on the nose of the cars that we would wrap. we used vinyl for this not wrap material. So I figured I would be able to wrap my fenders. Not so fast the multiple compound curves in the fender is a killer. I tried two then three pieces and never felt that they looked good enough to make me happy. So if you look at my car the sides are wrapped the fenders are painted so are the hood and engine cover as I originally planed. The wrap would of been cheaper by far.
 

Briann1177

Goblin Guru
Cheaper is always good, but there is no denying the sexiness of a clean paint job. :)

My only thought is to know what your limitations are in doing things, and don't try to exceed them to save a buck, gain knowledge or whatever. The final finish is one of the most important parts of the build, and if it ends up looking like $h!t, then you're not going to be happy and it's going to cost you more in the long run to keep redoing it than if you had it professionally done in the first place.
 

Ark :D

Goblin Guru
Thanks all.

I'm cost-conscious, but I'm not going to be cheap about anything. Cost is a factor but it's not THE factor. I will come out the other end of this tunnel with a Goblin that looks great and runs well, regardless of the cost.

I will more than likely pick up some cheap, aka "disposable" wrap, and try my hand at it. Like many here, I have some experience with window tint and decals on commercial vehicles.

As far as wrap prep, what would be the best approach? I'm planning to lightly sand the hood to get rid of inconsistencies on the surface, then apply 3M Primer 94. That should give a good surface for the wrap to adhere to. Then I'll use some edge sealer if necessary, but it sounds like that might not be a great idea, as it seems to rather permanently mar the surface.
 

Karter2026

Goblin Guru
As far as wrap prep, what would be the best approach? I'm planning to lightly sand the hood to get rid of inconsistencies on the surface, then apply 3M Primer 94. That should give a good surface for the wrap to adhere to. Then I'll use some edge sealer if necessary, but it sounds like that might not be a great idea, as it seems to rather permanently mar the surface.
I used the the edge primer on the side panels. I did not wrap the carbon fiber around the panel. It is still holding strong. I did try it on the curve on the fender where the brackets bolt on. It is unforgiving as soon as it touches it sticks. As far as prep a good smooth surface that has been wet sanded with 1500 grit will work just fine. Make sure you wipe it down with wax and grease remover.
 

Ark :D

Goblin Guru
That sounds essentially identical to paint prep. I'll give it a shot with just wet-sanding + wax/grease remover and we'll see what happens. If I need the primer after all, I'll just redo it.
 

ctuinstra

Goblin Guru
We did not do any prep work for the wrap other than clean the surface. No problems whatsoever.

A good quality wrap material is a lot easier to work with than some cheap wrap, just saying. The one that I have from racingraphics.com seems to be really good. Heat will allow it to stretch but if you pull too much on it and it get too stretched out, oddly, heat comes to the rescue again. If you heat it again but don't pull on it, it will relax back into the original shape. Now you can only do this so many times before it doesn't move as well, but this helped a lot in those hard to do areas that I ended up putting it down and pulling it up a couple of times.
 

jamesm

Goblin Guru
I tried 3 times to wrap the hood before I threw all the amazon vinyl away and had a local guy do mine for me.
 

jirwin

Well-Known Member
We did not do any prep work for the wrap other than clean the surface. No problems whatsoever.

A good quality wrap material is a lot easier to work with than some cheap wrap, just saying. The one that I have from racingraphics.com seems to be really good. Heat will allow it to stretch but if you pull too much on it and it get too stretched out, oddly, heat comes to the rescue again. If you heat it again but don't pull on it, it will relax back into the original shape. Now you can only do this so many times before it doesn't move as well, but this helped a lot in those hard to do areas that I ended up putting it down and pulling it up a couple of times.

+1 on good quality wrap being a must. If you look, a lot of the more expensive (like 3M) material has air channels under the vinyl. This makes it soooo much easier to get rid of air bubbles.
 

Ark :D

Goblin Guru
So the cheap Amazon wrap came in today and I gave it a shot. I didn't do too bad, but there's flaws in it so I don't consider it done. I'll get some different wrap and re-do the hood, now that I got some practice.
 

Ark :D

Goblin Guru
That's what I've got coming the second time around.

Karter, did you split your hood into two pieces? If so, how did you deal with the seam?
 
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