Wheel bearing spacer

Towerdog

Well-Known Member
I pitched mine also... I think they are more like gaskets so the aluminum doesn't corrode to the bearing face. Being stored indoors and driven in good weather I don't think that would be a problem. Caint see how a couple of thousands would make a difference back there.
 

dastrups

Well-Known Member
I pitched mine also... I think they are more like gaskets so the aluminum doesn't corrode to the bearing face. Being stored indoors and driven in good weather I don't think that would be a problem. Caint see how a couple of thousands would make a difference back there.
I hope you’re right. Jeff just said nothing on his end so I may be out of luck.
 

Ross

Goblin Guru
Most auto supply stores have it. It is like a cereal box thickness of carboard, so you can cut it with scissors or a knife.
If you put a thin layer of oil or grease on the part, then press it hard against the gasket paper, it will leave an oil mark the exact shape you need.
Just cut around the oil mark, and you have made a new gasket.
Gasket paper is oil proof/resistant so it won't hurt it, but you could trace it with a pencil, or use wet paint, etc.
I have also used a hammer, and put the gasket paper on the part, and lightly tapped the hammer to break the gasket paper at the 90 degree edge of the part. Tap all the way around an item, and at each hole, and you have made a gasket by just holding it on the part.
 

TheNuker

Goblin Guru
From what I understand on the HHR forums these were actually just some kind of water shield for the brakes? I don't have them either and doubt I'll make any gasket to go in.

Nuker-
 

TheNuker

Goblin Guru

This has a few things that might work, I think if we use the "dust shields" and cut off all the extra your basically have your spacer.

Nuker-
 

Waterdriver

Goblin Guru
Anybody have two of these? I messaged jeff on Facebook but thought I would try asking everyone. I really wish I had done a better job of holding on to everything.
Thank you for posting this. My 2005 SS didn't have these spacers but it makes sense now.
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I ran my car at a lower rear ride height and when the suspension compressed the rotor would make contact with the ball joint. In the pic you can see that telltale sign on the rotor. That spacer would give me the extra clear I need.

In the quick search I did, those spacers are either steel or aluminum. I'll be on the hunt for some and if I find any I'll post back here.
 

Waterdriver

Goblin Guru
Striking out on the search for the part.
If anyone who has this part, can they measure its thickness and post it?
Thinking of making some from aluminum shim stock.
 

dastrups

Well-Known Member
I was going to try without but now I am a little worried I may run into the same problem. I was going to go get some gasket paper at autozone and try and make something that will work. Is there any way to measure what the clearance is from the ball joint to the rotor? I am curious if we have the same clearance.
 

Waterdriver

Goblin Guru
The clearance increases and decreases through the suspension travel. So your instance may be different.
Suspension fully extended = more clearance. Fully compressed = contact. This is on my car, so not everyone's may do this. (New wheel bearing hubs and ball joints.) I did swap to 4x100 hubs, so that may be part of my issue right there.

To compensate for the contact I've had to run a little over -1.5 degrees of rear camber to keep the contact from happening and the tires aren't liking it. Needing to change to around -1 and test.

You could assemble a rear corner of the suspension with rotor caliper, minus the spring. Include installing the bump stop. Use a couple of lug nuts with spacers or washers to bolt down the rotor.
Compress the suspension to touching the bumpstop.
Now see if you can slide a piece of paper between the ball joint and the rotor. If the paper will pass between the two, your good.

To help with my issue I just recently installed another pair of stock spings with only half a coil removed instead of a full coil. Also installed a bumpstop and a half to reduce compression travel. (Thanks Jcas for those parts)
This increased the ride height which increased the rotor/ball joint clearance. A side benefit will be a deeper rear diffuser for increased volume/rake and more ground clearance for, well, the heavier passengers.

I apologize for the ramble but sometimes the info helps.
 

Ross

Goblin Guru
I was going to try without but now I am a little worried I may run into the same problem. I was going to go get some gasket paper at autozone and try and make something that will work. Is there any way to measure what the clearance is from the ball joint to the rotor? I am curious if we have the same clearance.
Put some putty on the ball joint, and let the rotor push it out of the way, as the suspension moves up and down. Some people use crumpled aluminum foil instead of putty, but the same idea. Good for checking hood to engine spacing too.
 

ccannx

Goblin Guru
I wonder if some versions contact and some do not. The ones I have are aftermarket and the balljoint is bolted on Instead of riveted. Limiting positive camber gain should keep it from happening. I wouldn't shave anything off.
 
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