Wheres video #25? Relocating brake reservoir

Oldchevyguy

Well-Known Member
Video 24 refers to next video 25 for relocating the brake fluid reservoir. Anyone have information on this?
 

ccannx

Well-Known Member
It turns 180 degrees and mounts to the side of the brake box. I had problems with the connections and used fuel hose clamps to snug the hose down real good.
 

askiles

Well-Known Member
I ended up using AN fittings and brake lines for these connections. Worked much better for me. I had issues finding good hose that wouldn't leak at the clamp connections, or wouldn't seep brake fluid. Note, most rubber hose is not brake fluid compatible, and will get eaten through by it. DF suggests using some of the nylon hose that came with the kit. The same hose used to extend the brake booster vacuum line. I eventually bit the bullet, paid some money, and bought some good pre-made AN brake hoses and fittings. Well worth it! Nice and secure piece of mind.
 

JeffsGoblin

Well-Known Member
I ended up using AN fittings and brake lines for these connections. Worked much better for me. I had issues finding good hose that wouldn't leak at the clamp connections, or wouldn't seep brake fluid. Note, most rubber hose is not brake fluid compatible, and will get eaten through by it. DF suggests using some of the nylon hose that came with the kit. The same hose used to extend the brake booster vacuum line. I eventually bit the bullet, paid some money, and bought some good pre-made AN brake hoses and fittings. Well worth it! Nice and secure piece of mind.
Andy, can you provide some pictures and part numbers?
 
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Oldchevyguy

Well-Known Member
Finally finished the remote tank installation. See picture. Now wondering what that plastic barb on the top of the tank near the cap is (or was) for? Looks like some kind of vent?
 

Ross

Well-Known Member
Finally finished the remote tank installation. See picture. Now wondering what that plastic barb on the top of the tank near the cap is (or was) for? Looks like some kind of vent?
It is plugged at the base. I cut mine off flush with the resevoir tank. People kept telling me I was missing a hose... now they don't.
 

Oldchevyguy

Well-Known Member
It is plugged at the base. I cut mine off flush with the resevoir tank. People kept telling me I was missing a hose... now they don't.
Dosent air have to enter there as the brake pads wear and the calipers move out? Most master cylinders have a vented cap for this. It appears chevy wanted filtered air to enter on these cars.
DOES ANYONE HAVE A DONER CAR WITH THIS HOSE STILL ATTACHED? I'm curious when it went!
 

Ross

Well-Known Member
Dosent air have to enter there as the brake pads wear and the calipers move out? Most master cylinders have a vented cap for this. It appears chevy wanted filtered air to enter on these cars.
DOES ANYONE HAVE A DONER CAR WITH THIS HOSE STILL ATTACHED? I'm curious when it went!
The molded plastic is blocked at the bottom. Any attached hose wouldn't let air in, unless you drill it out.
 

Parson Green

Active Member
The molded plastic is blocked at the bottom. Any attached hose wouldn't let air in, unless you drill it out.
If the block at the bottom is punctured a port is thereby created via which pressure bleeding of the system can be performed.

copied from motor.com: Yet another variation on the pressure bleeding method applies pressure at the master cylinder reservoir, forcing fresh brake fluid into the master cylinder, then through the brake lines to the calipers and wheel cylinders. The steady pressure that’s applied encourages the old fluid, sludge and other debris to exit when the bleeder screws are opened. Pressure and vacuum can also be combined. Low pressure applied at the master cylinder reservoir keeps it filled with fresh fluid, while vacuum applied at the bleeder screws encourages the old fluid to leave.

Pressure bleeding involves an adapter plate or cover that’s placed over the top of the master cylinder reservoir. Once the cover is in place, the reservoir is pressurized, forcing fresh fluid through the system. The main drawback to this method is that special adapters may be required to seal the master cylinder reservoir for pressure bleeding. This increases setup time and tooling costs.


When the port is not being used it can be capped.

 
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